Linda Evangelista, Cindy Crawford, Naomi Campbell and Christy Turlington – the biggest supermodels of the 90s, All Over Press.

Linda Evangelista, Cindy Crawford, Naomi Campbell and Christy Turlington – the biggest supermodels of the 90s, All Over Press.

10 MOMENTS THAT CHANGED FASHION

Scandalous, surprising or just plain spectacular: they’re the moments that left a permanent mark on fashion history, changing the way we get dressed forever.

Cindy Crawford and Kate Moss, All Over Press.

SUPERMODELS
They were the girls everyone wanted to be, the new generation of models who became celebs in their own right in the late 1980s. The Supers, known on first-name basis – Cindy, Naomi, Linda and Christy – were so successful that Linda even joked they wouldn't get out of bed for less than $10,000 a day.

WAIFS
After the glam 1980s, the 1990s became known for a more back-to-basics look, with the Waif look storming onto the scene. Photographer Corinne Day’s images of a young Kate Moss showcased a new, natural beauty that was very laidback and, yes, very thin.

Anna Dello Russo, All Over Press.

STREET STYLE PHOTOGRAPHY
With the blog boom, fashion became more accessible than ever, thanks to photographers on the street. The format, popularised by Bill Cunningham in New York, became dominated by the likes of The Sartorialist, Face Hunter and Tommy Ton, who travel the world in search of the freshest style.

Dior's New Look and Mary Quant, All Over Press.

DIOR’S NEW LOOK
Christian Dior revolutionised fashion on 12 February 1947, when he unveiled his New Look for women. The contoured Bar suit, with its nipped-in waist and full skirt, brought womenswear into a new era with a style that moved with the body like never before.

THE MINI-SKIRT
Mary Quant introduced the mini-skirt in 1964, perfect for the fashionable young women on London’s King’s Road who could move, jump and dance in the shorter style. Hemlines have gone up and down since then, but a short skirt has never truly gone out of fashion.

Elsa Schiaparelli and Coco Chanel, All Over Press/TT.

ELSA SCHIAPARELLI’S ARTISTIC COLLABORATIONS
Italian designer Schiaparelli was one of fashion’s more innovative thinkers, breaking the mould for designers in the 20th century. But it was her work with Surrealist artists like Salvador Dalí and Jean Cocteau that paved the way for fashion and art’s union.

COCO CHANEL DOES TROUSERS
It’s amazing how much of our wardrobes Chanel can take credit for. If it wasn’t for the designer’s trousers in the 1920s, later beloved by the likes of Marlene Dietrich, the truly stylish two-legger might never have come into our fashion lexicon. Thank you, Coco Chanel!

Comme des Garçons, Fall/Winter 2014, TT

COMME DES GARÇONS IN PARIS
When Rei Kawakubo brought Comme des Garçons to Paris in 1981, the capital wasn’t ready for what was coming. The industry, used to couture gowns and glamour, went into shock at the sight of black, asymmetrical outfits on the runway, but with time the label’s anti-chic became a staple of the style scene.

Bryan Boy and Anna Dello Russo front row and Prada Spring/Summer 1996, TT/All Over Press.

THE BLOGGING BOOM
From the mid 2000s, fashion blogging opened up the industry to everyone with a computer. By taking power into their hands, bloggers like Susie Bubble and Tavi Gevinson became the new major players, reaching fever pitch in 2008, when Marc Jacobs named a bag after blogger Bryanboy. While their role in the fashion world is still evolving, the popularity of blogs at every level speaks for itself.

PRADA MIXES UGLY AND CUTE
Miuccia Prada let her taste for geometric prints and clashing colours take over the runway in the 1990s, challenging what we think is cute and what is ugly. Nylon backpacks, for instance, became the new must-haves – unheard of in an industry driven by glam and glitz.

Back to feed
Back to top