• Adam Ferriss.

  • Adam Ferriss.

  • Adam Ferriss.

  • Adam Ferriss.

  • Adam Ferriss.

  • Adam Ferriss.

  • Adam Ferriss.

ALTERED IMAGES: ADAM FERRISS

American digital artist Adam Ferriss uses code to find new patterns in existing images and videos. Both eerie and mesmerising, his work is taking him from art galleries to global sportswear.

I’m really a tinkerer at heart. When I was younger, I was interested in darkroom photography. I was enamoured with big cameras and old wet printing processes. I wanted to manipulate my negatives in unusual ways with the chemicals, but at some point, it felt like I was walking over well-trodden ground. I ended up turning to code to produce something that felt truly new and different. 

The lack of a proper coding background probably both helps and hinders me. Meaning, I know just enough to get things working, but not enough to reliably produce predictable outputs. In my last year of college I took two ‘Introduction to Code’ courses. If I could go back, I would definitely have taken more.

In many ways, I’m just another process junkie – I'll build a project, keep stacking different layers on top until it becomes something wholly new, and then at some point the original project becomes unrecognisable. This works to my detriment too, as I’ll often forget how I originally did something.

It’s always really nice to see your own work in print. Last year, Conveyor Magazine did a little feature on some of my work, and this year I made a risograph print series with Never Press. I just finished up working on a huge video for Nike, which was my first really large job. I’m very happy with the outcome, and I’ll be sharing it very soon.

It’s also fantastic to meet up with people. I was invited to show some video for a monthly video art screening called Ghosting here in LA, and the folks that run the event have now become great friends of mine.

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