Christie Brinkley works out in pink leg warmers, All Over Press.

Christie Brinkley works out in pink leg warmers, All Over Press.

10 UNLIKELY TRENDS WE ACTUALLY WORE

Some trends age better than others, and while we all aspire to look back at our younger fashion choices and not cringe, well… Here are the most unbelievable trends from days gone by.

Princess Diana in a puffball skirt and a muff from Chanel, All Over Press.

10. PUFFBALL SKIRT
Conjuring images of backcombed hair, neon eyeshadow and Cyndi Lauper, the puffball skirt was key to a dramatic look during the 1980s. But unlike other extreme 1980s trends, it was popular amongst both high street and high fashion, with puffballs and prom dresses haunting the runways as well as the dancefloor.

9. MUFFS
The muff might be one of the more innovative items on our list, a cosy, detached sleeve to keep your hands warm in cold weather. First popular in the 16th century, nowadays they’re considered a ladylike but outdated relic of the past.

Henry VIII shows off his codpiece, All Over Press.

8. CODPIECES
Maybe it’s not an area we want to draw extra attention to today, but codpieces were all the rage in the Renaissance. The pouch covering a gentleman’s crotch, best showcased by Henry VIII, enjoyed a period of popularity due to its manly prowess, before falling out of style by the start of the 17th century.

Marie Antoinette in a huge wig, All Over Press.

7. 18TH-CENTURY WIGS
Today’s hairstyles seem positively staid compared with those in the past – in the 18th century, a powdered wig on a man’s head was a status symbol, and women followed suit by powdering and piling their own locks in ornate shapes on top of their heads in a decadent display.

Rave kids from the 90s, All Over Press.

6. RAVE JEANS
The surefire sign of the cool kid in the 1990s, huge baggy jeans were all the rage and when it came to size, the bigger the better. And if they had some edgy embroidery and patches that showed off your counter-cultural credentials, all the better.

Paris Hilton in her pink tracksuit and Carrie Grant in leg warmers, All Over Press.

5. VELOUR TRACKSUITS
The ultimate in luxury loungewear, velour tracksuits became a status symbol among socialites and celebs in the 2000s. Bonus points if you had some kind of slogan written across the rear and for the truly relaxed, a pair of Uggs finished the laidback look. 

4. LEG WARMERS
Migrating from the dance studio to the streets, leg warmers were part of the streetwear crossover that dominated 1980s style. Nowadays, wearing what look like socks with no toes might seem strange, but at the time it was the hottest way to work a little aerobic style into your look.

The 50s bullet bra, Getty Images.

3. BULLET BRAS
In the 1950s, pin-up style demanded a pneumatic silhouette, emphasising a woman’s curves to a crazy degree. Bullet bras were crucial in getting the all-American Sweater Girl look at the time, and were briefly brought back by Madonna and Jean Paul Gaultier in the 1980s.

Paula Adbul took her scrunchie on stage, All Over Press.

2. SCRUNCHIES
The scrunchie is the great divider, splitting opinion more than a blogger’s latest redesign. For some it’s a bygone anachronism that belongs firmly in 1989. For others, it’s an essential part of the modern It girl’s hair-wardrobe, a cute and fun way to tie a wild mane together.

Joan Collins in impressive shoulder pads, All Over Press.

1. EXTREME SHOULDER PADS
Power. Status. Wealth. Who would have thought the humble shoulder pad could mean so much? In the 1980s, at its glorious height – no pun intended – shoulder pads were an essential part of power dressing, as women sought to succeed in the boardroom and outside it, too, using a sharp suit as a key weapon in their arsenal.

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